Explicit Content Related To Mexicans – Please Review

For cultural news, please see here: Chicano Culture.

In this page, we review possibly objectionable content related to Mexicans. We have stored these tweets in a database. Many people make statements on Twitter ‘with a pinch of salt’. However, therein lies a powerful question: who gets to define what is simply a cheeky reference and what crosses the line as cemented or fomenting detrimental worldviews? A few simple questions will help the reader of the tweets figure out what to potentially report to Twitter:

  • Can this person make this statement in front of the demographic mentioned?
  • Is this a member of the community referenced?
  • Can this person make this statement at work without an HR consult afterwards or some other kind of censure?

If the answer to any of the above mentioned is “no”, then this tweet is likely objectionable and worth passing along to Twitter.

The social media representation of communities is important. While Freedom of Speech is important too and we should not seek to prevent statements from being uttered/tweeted, we can check their propagation; a racially biased or offensive view must always be countered by a concerted rebuttal.

Chicano Chatter On Twitter

Check out the latest chatter from people using the word ‘Chicano’ on twitter.

In an effort to highlight more content, we developed a few database queries to routinely retrieve uncontroversial tweets. Some of these contain frivolous references or insightful comments. Unfortunately, in many social media platforms, some of the least informed content often gets more elevated in the general public’s conscience. This page is an effort to add visibility to the reactions, concerns and ideas of the less prominent (“unliked”, less indexed) voices on Twitter, which are equally valid.

In this page, you can monitor content that contains the keyword ‘Chicano’ without any explicit content. For that more flagrant content, please visit this link. This relatively neutral content should be easy enough to follow along. I sort this list of tweets programmatically; using the Twitter Search API, I am able to amass a daily sampling of tweets on the concepts most.

At any rate, these pages allow one to observe what topics are on the mind of the more vocal members of the community. Feel free to report to twitter any objectionable content. The tweets are shown in their entirety and the views expressed their do not express my own or those of my employer.

The content is refreshed roughly every 24 hours. You will either get today’s results or the day before.

US Employee Pensions Finance PEGASUS Software; University of California, CALPERS Among Group

This article is reshared with permission from La Cartita. Originally published in that platform 12/16/2017.

La Cartita — (6/30/2017) — PEGASUS is the worlds most advanced spyware, a special type of software designed to spy on cellular phones and computers without the user’s permission. The software is most often used to target a victim’s phone camera and microphone. The audio and video are recorded and then leveraged against the victim in some way. PEGASUS is designed by the NSO Group, a team of former and current Israeli soldiers from UNIT 8200, a signals intelligence unit from the Israeli army (Israeli Defense Forces or IDF). The company was (and may still be) subsidized by the Israeli government. All of the funds that develop the Israeli’s espionage capacity is ultimately from the large military aid package provided by the US government.

Francisco Partners LP, the real owners of PEGASUS

PEGASUS was recently the subject of a highly circulated article from the NY Times detailing how the NSO Group’s software was found to have been used by the Mexican government against activist lawyers and journalists. The NY Times article was based primarily on a report from Citizen’s Lab group in Toronto. NSO Group works exclusively with governments. The first documented use of the software was against Ahmed Mansoor, a respected legal scholar who speaks out against torture.

Unfortunately, NSO Group does not operate independently of private capital. NSO Group was acquired by a private equity firm: Francisco Partners LP. The firm has several technology holdings, for instance, a software unit from Dell Computers that was spun off to Francisco Partners LP.

II. CALPERS puts 100 Million on Pegasus’ Owner; UC Regents 25 million
CALPERS funds Francisco Partners LP, owners of the NSO Group

Francisco Partners LP has two publicly listed locations that function as their corporate offices. There is 1 Letterman Drive, C Suite 410, San Francisco, California and another office in London. Their holdings are valued at 8 billion dollars. Ironically, they are increasingly in a better position to exploit commercial software since they own increasingly ubiquitous software and hardward platforms to which the NSO Group can presumably gain privileged access.

Francisco Partners LP has many government contacts. At least, one can assume this to be case with the high number of public pension funds that have invested in the company. Most notably for some of our readers, CALPERS has paid into a 100,000,000 dollars into a Francisco Partners LP fund. The following is a cursory review of the amount invested in Francisco Partners LP’s funds from US public pensions.

The Following Public Pensions Pay Into Francisco Partners LP Fund: *** How To Interpret Figures: The amount invested is to the right. The rightmost section contains the latest known investment made from the Public Pension funds to the Franscico Partners LP funds that finance company operations, e.g. capitalization, providing loan collateral, operating costs. etc.

    California Public Employees’ Retirement System USD 100,000,000 9/30/2016
    Oregon Public Employees Retirement System USD 100,000,000 12/31/2016
    University of Texas Investment Management Co/The USD 75,000,000 5/31/2016
    California State Teachers’ Retirement System USD 75,000,000 9/30/2016
    Florida Retirement System USD 75,000,000 9/30/2016
    New York City Fire Pension Fund USD 75,000,000 6/30/2016
    Colorado Public Employees’ Retirement Association USD 50,000,000 12/31/2015
    School Employees Retirement System of Ohio USD 40,000,000 12/31/2016
    Regents of the University of California/The USD 25,000,000 9/30/2014
    West Midlands Pension Fund USD 30,008,541 3/31/2016
    University of Michigan USD 20,000,000 9/17/2009
    Pennsylvania State Employees’ Retirement System USD 20,000,000 12/31/2015
    Ohio Police & Fire Pension Fund USD 15,000,000 6/30/2014

III. The profit model for NSO Group: Hack More, Pay Less: Realizing Scale

Documents leaked to the NY Times revealed the NSO Group’s external clients and their fee structure. The NSO group charges USD 500,000 dollars to a client state that wishes to install their software in some piece of hardware. An additional USD 650,000 dollars is assessed to intercept/hack 10 I-Phones or 10 Androids. Finally, a client may be charged USD 800,000 dollars more to hack 100 phones of any make or model. This pricing model reflects a disposition to hack more in order for a government to ‘get its money’s worth’.

IV. Government of Mexico: Ayotzinapa Hacks

The Government of Mexico – even before it had a massive fiasco in its hands with the Ayotzinapa case of 2014 – has, at least, 80 million dollars invested in projects with the NSO group since 2013. That figure could only have gone up since the EPN administration struggles to maintain power.

The Ayotzinapa case involves many dozens of lawyers and activist groups. A rough estimate from the Inter American Commission on Human Rights claims that at least 196 people were affected on the night of September 26, 2014. These people and their extended families should presume themselves to be subjects of surveillance in one shape or another because of their legal connection and right to claim restitution. At the time of writing, many of the direct family member’s of the disappeared 43 have phones that exhibit strange behavior.

Word2Vec Mexican Spanish Model: Lyrics, News Documents

A Corpus That Contains Colloquial Lyrics & News Documents For Mexican Spanish

This experimental dataset was developed by 4 Social Science specialists and one industry expert, myself, with different samples from Mexico specific news texts and normalized song lyrics. The intent is to understand how small, phrase level constituents will interact with larger, editorialized style text. There appears to be no ill-effect with the combination of varied texts.

We are working on the assumption that a single song is a document. A single news article is a document too.

In this post, we provide a Mexican Spanish Word2Vec model compatible with the Gensim python library. The word2vec model is derived from a corpus created by 4 research analysts and myself. This dataset was tagged at the document level for the topic of ‘Mexico’ news. The language is Mexican Spanish with an emphasis on alternative news outlets.

One way to use this WVModel is shown here: scatterplot repo.

Lemmatization Issues

We chose to not lemmatize this corpus prior to including in the word vector model. The reason is two-fold: diminished performance and prohibitive runtime length for the lemmatizer. It takes close to 8 hours for a Spacy lemmatizer to run through the entire set of sentences and phrases. Instead, we made sure normalization was sufficiently accurate and factored out major stopwords.

Training Example

Below we show some basic examples as to how we would train based on the data text. The text is passed along to the Word2Vec module. The relevant parameters are set, but the user/reader can change as they see fit. Ultimately, this saved W2V model will be saved locally.

In this case, the named W2Vec model “Mex_Corona_.w2v” is a name that will be referenced down below in top_5.py.

from gensim.models import Word2Vec, KeyedVectors

important_text = normalize_corpus('C:/<<ZYZ>>/NER_news-main/corpora/todomexico.txt')

#Build the model, by selecting the parameters.
our_model = Word2Vec(important_text, vector_size=100, window=5, min_count=2, workers=20)
#Save the model
our_model.save("Mex_Corona_.w2v")
#Inspect the model by looking for the most similar words for a test word.
#print(our_model.wv.most_similar('mujeres', topn=5))
scatter_vector(our_model, 'Pfizer', 100, 21) 

Corpus Details

Specifically, from March 2020 to July 2021, a group of Mexico City based research analysts determined which documents were relevant to this Mexico news category. These analysts selected thousands of documents, with about 1200 of these documents at an average length of 500 words making its way to our Gensim language model. Additionally, the corpus contained here is made out of lyrics with Chicano slang and colloquial Mexican speech.

We scrapped the webpages of over 300 Mexican ranchero and norteño artists on ‘https://letras.com‘. These artists ranged from a few dozen composers in the 1960’s to contemporary groups who code-switch due to California or US Southwest ties. The documents tagged as news relevant to the Mexico topic were combined with these lyrics with around 20 of the most common stopword removed. This greatly reduced the size of the original corpus while also increasing the accuracy of the word2vec similarity analysis.

In addition to the stop word removal, we also conducted light normalization. This was restricted to finding colloquial transcriptions and converting these to orthographically correct versions on song lyrics.

Normalizing Spanish News Data

Large corporations develop language models under guidance of product managers whose life experiences do not reflect that of users. In our view, there is a chasm between the consumer and engineer that underscores the need to embrace alternative datasets. Therefore, in this language model, we aimed for greater inclusion. The phrases are from a genre that encodes a rich oral history with speech commonly used amongst Mexicans in colloquial settings.

Song Lyrics For Colloquial Speech

This dataset contains lyrics from over 300 groups. The phrase length lyrics have been normalized to obey standard orthographic conventions. It also contains over 1000 documents labeled as relevant to Mexico news.

Coronavirus and similar words.

Github Lyrics Gensim Model

We have made the lyrics and news language model available. The model is contained here alongside some basic normalization methods on a module.

Colloquial Words

The similarity scores for a word like ‘amor’ (love) is shown below. In our colloquial/lyrics language model, we can see how ‘corazon’ is the closest to ‘amor’.

print(our_model.wv.most_similar('amor', topn=1))
[('corazon', 0.8519232869148254)]

Let’s try to filter through the most relevant 8 results for ‘amor’:

scatter_vector('mx_lemm_ner-unnorm_1029_after_.w2v', 'amor', 100, 8)
Out[18]: 
[('corazon', 0.8385680913925171),
 ('querer', 0.7986088991165161),
 ('jamas', 0.7974023222923279),
 ('dime', 0.788547158241272),
 ('amar', 0.7882217764854431),
 ('beso', 0.7817134857177734),
 ('adios', 0.7802879214286804),
 ('feliz', 0.7777709364891052)]

For any and all inquiries, please send me a linkedin message here: Ricardo Lezama. The word2vec language model file is right here: Spanish-News-Colloquial.

Here is the scatterplot for ‘amor’:

Scatterplot for ‘amor’.

Diversity Inclusion Aspect – Keyterms

Visualizing the data is fairly simple. The scatterplot method allows us to show which terms surface in similar contexts.

Diversity in the context of Mexican Spanish news text. Query: “LGBT”

Below, I provide an example of how to call the Word2Vec model. These Word2Vec documents are friendly to the Word2Vec modules.

from gensim.models import Word2Vec, KeyedVectors
coronavirus_mexico = "mx_lemm_ner-unnorm_1029_after_.w2v"
coronavirus = "coronavirus-norm_1028.w2v"
wv_from_text = Word2Vec.load(coronavirus)

#Inspect the model by looking for the most similar words for a test word.
print(wv_from_text.wv.most_similar('dosis', topn=5))
#Let us see what the 10-dimensional vector for 'computer' looks like.

Semantic Similarity & Visualizing Word Vectors

Introduction: Two Views On Semantic Similarity

In Linguistics and Philosophy of Language, there are various methods and views on how to best describe and justify semantic similarity. This tutorial will be taken as a chance to lightly touch upon very basic ideas in Linguistics. We will introduce in a very broad sense the original concept of semantic similarity as it pertains to natural language.

Furthermore, we will see how the linguistics view is drastically different from the state of the art Machine Learning techniques. I offer no judgments on why this is so. It’s just an opportunity to compare and contrast passively. Keeping both viewpoints in mind during an analysis is helpful. Ultimately, it maximizes our ability to understand valid Machine Learning output.

The Semantic Decomposition View

There is a compositional view that in its earliest 19th century incarnation is attributable to Gottleb Frege, in which the meaning of terms can be decomposed into simpler components such that the additive process of combining them yields a distinct meaning. Thus, two complex meanings may be similar to one another if they are composed of the same elements.

For example, the meaning of ‘king’ could be construed as an array of features, like the property of being human, royalty and male. Under this reasoning, the same features would carry over to describe ‘queen’, but the decomposition of the word would replace male with female. Thus, in the descriptive and compositional approach mentioned, categorical descriptions are assigned to words whereby decomposing a word reveals binary features for ‘human’, ‘royalty’ and ‘male’. Breaking down concepts represented by words into simpler meanings is what is meant with ‘feature decomposition’ in a semantic and linguistic context.

The Shallow Similarity View

Alternatively, Machine Learning approaches to semantic similarity involves a contextual approach towards the description of a word. In Machine Learning approaches, there is an assignment of shared indices between words. The word ‘king’ and ‘queen’ will appear in more contexts that are similar to one another than other words. In contrast, the words ‘dog’ or ‘cat’, which implies that they share more in common. Intuitively, we understand that these words have more in common due to their usage in very similar contexts. The similarity is represented as a vector in a graph. Each word can have closely adjacent vectors reflecting their similar or shared contexts.

Where both approaches eventually converge is in the ability for the output of a semantic theory or vector driven description of words matches with language users intuitions. In this tutorial and series of examples, we will observe how the Word2Vec module does fairly well with new, recent concepts that only recently appeared in mass texts. Furthermore, these texts are in Mexican Spanish, which implies that the normalization steps are unique to these pieces of unstructured data.

Working With Mexican Spanish In Word2Vec

In this series of python modules, I created a vector model from a Mexican Spanish news corpus. Each module has a purpose: normalization.py cleans text so that it can be interpretable for Word2Vec. Normalization also produces the output lists necessary to pass along to Gensim. Scatterplot.py visualizes the vectors.from the model. This corpus was developed as described below.

This dataset of 4000 documents is verified as being relevant to several topics. For this tutorial, there are three relevant topics: {Mexico, Coronavirus, and Politics}. Querying the model for words in this pragmatic domain is what is most sensible. This content exists in the LaCartita Db and is annotated by hand. The annotators are a group of Mexican graduates from UNAM and IPN universities. A uniform consensus amongst the news taggers was required for its introduction into the set of documents. There were 3 women and 1 man within the group of analysts, with all of them having prior experience gathering data in this domain.

While the 4000 Mexican Spanish news documents analyzed are unavailable on github, a smaller set is provided on that platform for educational purposes. Under all conditions, the data was tokenized and normalized with a set of Spanish centric regular expressions.

Please feel free to reach out to that group in research@lacartita.com for more information on this hand-tagged dataset.

Normalization in Spanish

There are three components to this script: normalizing, training a model and visualizing the data points within the model. This is why we have SkLearn and Matplotlib for visualization, gensim for training and custom python for normalization. In general, the pipeline cleans data, organizes it into a list of lists format that works for the Word2Vec module and trains a model. I’ll explain how each of those steps is performed below.

The normalize_corpus Method

Let’s start with the normalization step which can be tricky given the fact that the dataset can sometimes present diacritics or characters not expected in English. We developed a regular expression that permits us to search and find all the valid text from the Mexican Spanish dataset.

from gensim.models import Word2Vec

import numpy as np 
 
import re 

from sklearn.manifold import TSNE

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

plt.style.use('ggplot')
   
def normalize_corpus(raw_corpus):
    """
    This function reads clean text. There is a read attribute for the text. 
 
    Argument: a file path that contains a well formed txt file.
    
    Returns: This returns a 'list of lists' format friendly to Gensim. Depending on the size of the  
    ""
    raw_corpus = open(raw_corpus,'r', encoding='utf-8').read().splitlines()
    #This is the simple way to remove stop words
    formatted_sentences=[]
    for sentences in raw_corpus:
        a_words = re.findall(r'[A-Za-z\-0-9\w+á\w+\w+é\w+\w+í\w+\w+ó\w+\w+ú\w+]+', sentences.lower())         
        formatted_sentences.append(a_words)
    return formatted_sentences

important_text = normalize_corpus(<<file-path>>)

Once we generate a list of formatted sentences, which consists of lists of lists containing strings (a single list is a ‘document’), we can use that total set of lists as input for a model. Building the model is likely the easiest part, but formatting the data and compiling it in a usable manner is the hardest. For instance, the document below is an ordered, normalized and tokenized list of strings from this Mexican Spanish News corpus. Feel free to copy/paste in case you want to review the nature of this document:

['piden', 'estrategia', 'inmediata', 'para', 'capacitar', 'policías', 'recientemente', 'se', 'han', 'registrado', 'al', 'menos', 'tres', 'casos', 'de', 'abuso', 'de', 'la', 'fuerza', 'por', 'parte', 'de', 'elementos', 'policiales', 'en', 'los', 'estados', 'de', 'jalisco', 'y', 'en', 'la', 'ciudad', 'de', 'méxico', 'el', 'economista', 'organizaciones', 'sociales', 'coincidieron', 'en', 'que', 'la', 'relación', 'entre', 'ciudadanos', 'y', 'policías', 'no', 'debe', 'ser', 'de', 'adversarios', 'y', 'las', 'autoridades', 'tanto', 'a', 'nivel', 'federal', 'como', 'local', 'deben', 'plantear', 'una', 'estrategia', 'inmediata', 'y', 'un', 'proyecto', 'a', 'largo', 'plazo', 'para', 'garantizar', 'la', 'profesionalización', 'de', 'los', 'mandos', 'policiacos', 'con', 'apego', 'a', 'los', 'derechos', 'humanos', 'recientemente', 'se', 'han', 'difundido', 'tres', 'casos', 'de', 'abuso', 'policial', 'el', 'primero', 'fue', 'el', 'de', 'giovanni', 'lópez', 'quien', 'fue', 'asesinado', 'en', 'jalisco', 'posteriormente', 'la', 'agresión', 'por', 'parte', 'de', 'policías', 'capitalinos', 'contra', 'una', 'menor', 'de', 'edad', 'durante', 'una', 'manifestación', 'y', 'el', 'tercero', 'fue', 'el', 'asesinato', 'de', 'un', 'hombre', 'en', 'la', 'alcaldía', 'coyoacán', 'en', 'la', 'cdmx', 'a', 'manos', 'de', 'policías', 'entrevistada', 'por', 'el', 'economista', 'la', 'presidenta', 'de', 'causa', 'en', 'común', 'maría', 'elena', 'morera', 'destacó', 'que', 'en', 'ningún', 'caso', 'es', 'admisible', 'que', 'los', 'mandos', 'policiales', 'abusen', 'de', 'las', 'y', 'los', 'ciudadanos', 'y', 'si', 'bien', 'la', 'responsabilidad', 'recae', 'sobre', 'el', 'uniformado', 'que', 'actúa', 'las', 'instituciones', 'deben', 'garantizar', 'la', 'profesionalización', 'de', 'los', 'elementos', 'los', 'policías', 'son', 'un', 'reflejo', 'de', 'la', 'sociedad', 'a', 'la', 'que', 'sirven', 'y', 'ello', 'refleja', 'que', 'hay', 'una', 'sociedad', 'sumamente', 'violenta', 'y', 'ellos', 'también', 'lo', 'son', 'y', 'no', 'lo', 'controlan', 'declaró', 'que', 'más', 'allá', 'de', 'que', 'el', 'gobernador', 'de', 'jalisco', 'enrique', 'alfaro', 'y', 'la', 'jefa', 'de', 'gobierno', 'de', 'la', 'cdmx', 'claudia', 'sheinbaum', 'condenen', 'los', 'hechos', 'y', 'aseguren', 'que', 'no', 'se', 'tolerará', 'el', 'abuso', 'policial', 'deben', 'iniciar', 'una', 'investigación', 'tanto', 'a', 'los', 'uniformados', 'involucrados', 'como', 'a', 'las', 'fiscalías', 'sobre', 'las', 'marchas', 'agregó', 'que', 'si', 'bien', 'las', 'policías', 'no', 'pueden', 'lastimar', 'a', 'las', 'personas', 'que', 'ejercen', 'su', 'derecho', 'a', 'la', 'libre', 'expresión', 'dijo', 'que', 'hay', 'civiles', 'que', 'no', 'se', 'encuentran', 'dentro', 'de', 'los', 'movimientos', 'y', 'son', 'agredidos', 'es', 'importante', 'decir', 'quién', 'está', 'tras', 'estas', 'manifestaciones', 'violentas', 'en', 'esta', 'semana', 'vimos', 'que', 'no', 'era', 'un', 'grupo', 'de', 'mujeres', 'luchando', 'por', 'sus', 'derechos', 'sino', 'que', 'fueron', 'grupos', 'violentos', 'enviados', 'a', 'generar', 'estos', 'actos', 'entonces', 'es', 'necesario', 'definir', 'qué', 'grupos', 'políticos', 'están', 'detrás', 'de', 'esto', 'puntualizó', 'el', 'coordinador', 'del', 'programa', 'de', 'seguridad', 'de', 'méxico', 'evalúa', 'david', 'ramírez', 'de', 'garay', 'dijo', 'que', 'las', 'autoridades', 'deben', 'de', 'ocuparse', 'en', 'plantear', 'una', 'estrategia', 'a', 'largo', 'plazo', 'para', 'que', 'las', 'instituciones', 'de', 'seguridad', 'tengan', 'la', 'estructura', 'suficiente', 'para', 'llevar', 'a', 'cabo', 'sus', 'labores', 'y', 'sobre', 'todo', 'tengan', 'como', 'objetivo', 'atender', 'a', 'la', 'ciudadanía', 'para', 'generar', 'confianza', 'entre', 'ellos', 'desde', 'hace', 'muchos', 'años', 'no', 'vemos', 'que', 'la', 'sociedad', 'o', 'los', 'gobiernos', 'federales', 'y', 'locales', 'tomen', 'en', 'serio', 'el', 'tema', 'de', 'las', 'policías', 'y', 'la', 'relación', 'que', 'tienen', 'con', 'la', 'comunidad', 'lo', 'que', 'estamos', 'viviendo', 'es', 'el', 'gran', 'rezago', 'que', 'hemos', 'dejado', 'que', 'se', 'acumule', 'en', 'las', 'instituciones', 'de', 'seguridad', 'indicó', 'el', 'especialista', 'apuntó', 'que', 'además', 'de', 'la', 'falta', 'de', 'capacitación', 'las', 'instituciones', 'policiales', 'se', 'enfrentan', 'a', 'la', 'carga', 'de', 'trabajo', 'la', 'falta', 'de', 'protección', 'social', 'de', 'algunos', 'uniformados', 'la', 'inexistencia', 'de', 'una', 'carrera', 'policial', 'entre', 'otras', 'deficiencias', 'la', 'jefa', 'de', 'la', 'unidad', 'de', 'derechos', 'humanos', 'de', 'amnistía', 'internacional', 'méxico', 'edith', 'olivares', 'dijo', 'que', 'la', 'relación', 'entre', 'policías', 'y', 'ciudadanía', 'no', 'debe', 'ser', 'de', 'adversarios', 'y', 'enfatizó', 'que', 'es', 'necesario', 'que', 'las', 'personas', 'detenidas', 'sean', 'entregadas', 'a', 'las', 'autoridades', 'correspondientes', 'para', 'continuar', 'con', 'el', 'proceso', 'señaló', 'que', 'este', 'lapso', 'es', 'el', 'de', 'mayor', 'riesgo', 'para', 'las', 'personas', 'que', 'son', 'detenidas', 'al', 'tiempo', 'que', 'insistió', 'en', 'que', 'las', 'personas', 'encargadas', 'de', 'realizar', 'detenciones', 'deben', 'tener', 'geolocalización', 'no', 'observamos', 'que', 'haya', 'una', 'política', 'sostenida', 'de', 'fortalecimiento', 'de', 'los', 'cuerpos', 'policiales', 'para', 'que', 'actúen', 'con', 'apego', 'a', 'los', 'derechos', 'humanos', 'lo', 'otro', 'que', 'observamos', 'es', 'que', 'diferentes', 'cuerpos', 'policiales', 'cuando', 'actúan', 'en', 'conjunto', 'no', 'necesariamente', 'lo', 'hacen', 'de', 'manera', 'coordinada']

We build the model with just a few lines of python code once the lists of lists are contained in an object. The next step is to provide these lists as the argument of the Word2Vec in the object important_text. The Word2Vec module has a few relevant commands and arguments, which I will not review in depth here.

from gensim.models import Word2Vec

important_text = normalize_corpus(<<file-path>>)

mexican_model = Word2Vec(important_text, vector_size=100, window=5, min_count=5, workers=10)

mexican_model.save("NewMod1el.w2v")

The scatterplot Method: Visualizing Data

The scatter plot method for vectors allows for quick visualization of similar terms. The scatterplot function uses as an argument a model that contains all the vector representations of the Spanish MX content.

def scatter_vector(modelo, palabra, size, topn):
    """ This scatter plot for vectors allows for quick visualization of similar terms. 
    
    Argument: a model containing vector representations of the Spanish MX content. word
    is the content you're looking for in the corpus.
    
    Return: close words    
    """
    arr = np.empty((0,size), dtype='f')
    word_labels = [palabra]
    palabras_cercanas = modelo.wv.similar_by_word(palabra, topn=topn)
    arr = np.append(arr, np.array([modelo.wv[palabra]]), axis=0)
    for wrd_score in palabras_cercanas:
        wrd_vector = modelo.wv[wrd_score[0]]
        word_labels.append(wrd_score[0])
        arr = np.append(arr, np.array([wrd_vector]), axis=0)
    tsne = TSNE(n_components=2, random_state=0)
    np.set_printoptions(suppress=True)
    Y = tsne.fit_transform(arr)
    x_coords = Y[:, 0]
    y_coords = Y[:, 1]
    plt.scatter(x_coords, y_coords)
    for label, x, y in zip(word_labels, x_coords, y_coords):
        plt.annotate(label, xy=(x, y), xytext=(0, 0), textcoords='offset points')
    plt.xlim(x_coords.min()+0.00005, x_coords.max()+0.00005)
    plt.ylim(y_coords.min()+0.00005, y_coords.max()+0.00005)
    plt.show()
    return palabras_cercanas

scatter_vector(modelo, 'coronavirus', 100, 21)

Coronavirus Word Vectors

The coronavirus corpus contained here is Mexico centric in it’s discussions. Generally, it was sourced from a combination of mainstream news sources, like La Jornada, and smaller digital only press, like SemMexico.

We used ‘Word2Vec’ to develop vector graph representations of words. This will allow us to rank the level of similarity between words with a number between 0 and 1. Word2Vec is a python module for indexing the shared context of words and then representing each as a vector/graph. Each vector is supposed to stand-in as a representation of meanning proximity based on word usage. We used Word2Vec to develop a semantic similarity representation for Coronavirus terminology within news coverage.

In this set of about 1200 documents, we created a vector model for key terms in the document; the printed results below show how related the other words are related to our target word ‘coronavirus‘. The most similar term was ‘covid-19’, virus and a shortening ‘covid’. The validity of these results were obvious enough and indicate that our document set contains enough content to represent our intuitions of this topic.

[('covid-19', 0.8591713309288025),
('virus', 0.8252751231193542),
('covid', 0.7919320464134216),
('sars-cov-2', 0.7188869118690491),
('covid19', 0.6791930794715881),
('influenza', 0.6357837319374084),
('dengue', 0.6119976043701172),
('enfermedad', 0.5872418880462646),
('pico', 0.5461580753326416),
('anticuerpos', 0.5339271426200867),
('ébola', 0.5207288861274719),
('repunte', 0.520190417766571),
('pandémica', 0.5115000605583191),
('infección', 0.5103719234466553),
('fumigación', 0.5102646946907043),
('alza', 0.4952083230018616),
('detectada', 0.4907490015029907),
('sars', 0.48677393794059753),
('curva', 0.48023557662963867),
('descenso', 0.4770597517490387),
('confinamiento', 0.4769912660121918)]
The word ‘coronavirus’ in Mexican Spanish text and its adjacent word vectors.

One of the measures for the merit of a large machine learning model is if the output aligns with the intuition of a human judgement. This implies that we should ask ourselves if the topmost ranked ‘similar’ words presented by this word2vec model matches up with our psychological opinion of ‘coronavirus’. Overwhelmingly, the answer is ‘yes’, since Covid and Covid19 nearly always mean the same thing, without a hyphen or if referenced as just ‘virus’ in some texts’.

Strong Normalization Leads To Better Vectors

Better normalization leads to better vectors.

This is verifiable in a scatterplot comparing the distinct text normalization that one intuits is best upon analyzing initial training data.

For example, many place names are effectively compound words or complex strings which can lead to misleading segmentation. This adds noise, effectively misaligning other words in the word vector model. Therefore, finding a quick way to ensure place names are represented accurately helps other unrelated terms surface away from their vector representation. Consider this below scatterplot where the names ‘baja california sur’ and ‘baja california’ are not properly tokenized:

Bad Segmentation Caused By Incomplete Normalization

Replacing the spaces between ‘Baja California Sur’, ‘Baja California’, and ‘Sur de California’, allows for other place names that pattern similarly to shine through in the scatterplot. This reflects more accurate word vector representations.

A better graph from replacing Baja California Sur to ‘bajacaliforniasur’ is a better way to capture the state name.

Leveraging NVIDIA Downloads

An issue during the installation of TensorFlow in the Anaconda Python environment is an error message citing the lack of a DLL file. Logically, you will also receive the same error for invoking any Spacy language models, which need TensorFlow installed properly.

Thus, running the code below will invoke an error message without the proper dependencies installed:

import spacy
import spacy.attrs
nlp = spacy.load('es_core_news_sm')

The error message below will appear if the NVIDIA GPU Developer kit is not installed:

"W tensorflow/stream_executor/platform/default/dso_loader.cc:64] Could not load dynamic library 'cudart64_110.dll'; dlerror: cudart64_110.dll not found"
"I tensorflow/stream_executor/cuda/cudart_stub.cc:29] Ignore above cudart dlerror if you do not have a GPU set up on your machine."

The issue is the lack of a GPU developer kit from NVIDIA.

CUDA Toolkit 11.4 Update 1 Downloads | NVIDIA Developer